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Scarsbrook Manor
















Scarsbrook Manor was a country mansion founded by Silvanus Scarsbrook who lived there with his family in the early eighteenth century. Aside from Silvanus and his wife Mary (Stokes) Scarsbrook, the manor house was inhabited by their sons Benjamin and Jonathan. Later, Benjamin’s wife Rebecca (Robinette) Scarsbrook moved in with him on the third floor. In 1701, Jonathan brought his wife Amanda (Prince) Scarsbrook to live at the manor as well. Later that year, Benjamin hung himself from a tree branch in the olive grove, and his spirit was bound there. Ownership passed to Silvanus’ grandson Benjamin Scarsbrook, Jr., who passed the manor house down the line until it was in the hands of his descendant Martin Scarsbrook. In 1992, Martin died, and the family continued to maintain Scarsbrook Manor, though no one chose to live there. The ghost of Benjamin Scarsbrook, Sr. lingered in the olive grove until July 1, 1999, when he stole the body of his descendant Amy (Smith) Bolton and left her spirit in his place.

            As of 1999, the house still stood at least three stories tall.

            The first floor had a kitchen with a small table and at least two chairs. The table was by a window that looked out onto the somewhat distant olive grove. There was also a refrigerator in the kitchen. Hanging on the wall, though not necessarily the same wall, were a clock and a phone. A number of bottle openers were stored in the kitchen as well.

            The bedroom of Benjamin Scarsbrook, Sr. and his wife was still intact on the third floor. It had a bed and a television set with a remote. There was also a bathroom on the third floor.
















All content Copyright 2005 by Glenn Slade Clark, Jr.
"Scarsbrook Manor" article by Thomas Awbrey